daysofsummer

C'est ça, mon panache, bordel de merde!

Hyouka + Interpretation + Rememembrance

My boyfriend wanted to watch Hyouka, and I wanted to watch it again, so I forced him to do it together. And then, something funny happened: watching this series I had so many memories of (watching it when I feeling down as an escape into an alternative mundane life, so close to mine and yet so much more), I realized it was about memory. Let me bore you with some description before I can explain why I interpreted it that way. The story begins with a monologue from its protagonist,…

When I was fifteen in late 2012, freshly a high school student, I began to learn Japanese. It was to help me with this that I picked up regular anime viewing. Wondering where to begin, I remembered one series a friend I’d known some years back told me about, but which I’d never finished: K-On! became my first anime as a dedicated viewer of the medium. It was extremely pleasant, but I did not feel especially affected by the experience; I liked the atmosphere, the comedy, the cuteness, but that…

Yuru Camp: Impressions

I recently watched Yuru Camp, all too late, because my boyfriend insisted that he wanted to rewatch it in my company. I did him the honor, and although sharing reactions and impressions with him took my focus away from a purely analytic point of view (hence why this is merely a blog post, which may however develop into a full-fledged article later on), I came back with some thoughts. Repetition In many anime, especially those of the Kirara-kei type, repetition is central. The original state is re-established on a higher…

The Small Treasures Of “Tasogare Memorandum”

It is a core aspect of fiction that it must have a relation to possession. The hero or heroine acquires: a lover, friends, realizations. The less fortunate protagonist has to live with what they lack: the aspiring artist laments their lack of talent; the worker enrages against their exploitation. The former earns because they are deserving; the latter learn the dignity to live with their condition. In some moral tales, the fool is blamed. We expect fiction to giveus something: characters must mirror this process for us to apply its…